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Tice Cin in Conversation with Lola Olufemi

Sad because you missed out on tickets for the launch of Tice Cin’s KEEPING THE HOUSE with Lola Olufemi a couple of weeks ago? Well, you can turn that frown around, because the whole event is now available to watch online

Tice and Lola’s discussion of the book’s unique exploration of the Turkish Cypriot underworld of North London received one of the most rapturous rounds of applause we can remember in some time!

Huge thanks to Tice and Lola, Nicky at And Other Stories, Father William Taylor at St. Thomas’ Church, Martine Sobey at Clapton Commons, and Lou Palmer for recording and production.

Keep an eye out for more of this kind of thing in the coming weeks and months, and in the meantime make sure you grab KEEPING THE HOUSE, which is in stock and available to order for collection or nationwide delivery.

London Clay: River Lea Walking Tour with Tom Chivers and Siddhartha Bose

19 September 2021 @ 2:00 pm 4:00 pm BST

£6

Join author Tom Chivers and poet Siddhartha Bose for a unique walking tour exploring the River Lea’s deep history

We’re thrilled to be hosting a special event to celebrate the arrival of Tom Chivers’ new book, LONDON CLAY: JOURNEYS IN THE DEEP CITY! Spend the afternoon of Sunday 19 September strolling along the River Lea with us as Tom leads a tour exploring the deep history of one of London’s most iconic waterways. Tom will be joined by poet Siddhartha Bose for what promises to be an unforgettable insight into the river’s historic depths.

About the Walk

We will meet at Hackney Marshes Pavilion (E5 0DH) at 2pm for a walk we expect to last between 2 and 2.5 hours. We intend the pace to be comfortable for most walkers, and will provide more specific route information as well as an anticipated end point shortly before the event. Please don’t hesitate to contact us if you’d like more information regarding the walk and it’s terrain, or any other details connected with the event.

About the Book

What secrets lie beneath a city?

Tom Chivers follows hidden pathways, explores lost islands and uncovers the geological mysteries that burst up through the pavement and bubble to the surface of our streets. From Roman ruins to a submerged playhouse, from an abandoned Tube station to underground rivers, Chivers leads us on a journey into the depths of the city he loves.

A lyrical interrogation of a capital city, a landscape and our connection to place, LONDON CLAY celebrates urban edgelands: in-between spaces where the natural world and the metropolis collide. Through a combination of historical research, vivid reportage and personal memoir, it will transform how you see London, and cities everywhere.

Copies of LONDON CLAY are available to buy with your ticket for collection at the start of the event (select the Add a Copy of LONDON CLAY option at checkout), and there will be a very limited number available to purchase on the day.

About the Tour Guides

Tom Chivers is a writer, publisher and arts producer. He was born in 1983 in south London. He has released two pamphlets and two collections of poetry, the latest being Dark Islands (Test Centre, 2015). His poems have been anthologised in Dear World & Everything In It and London: A History in Verse. He was shortlisted for the Michael Marks and Edwin Morgan Poetry Awards and received an Eric Gregory Award in 2011. Tom has made perambulatory, site-specific and audio work for organisations including LIFT, Cape Farewell, Humber Mouth and Southbank Centre. He was writer in residence at Bishopsgate Institute and associate artist of the National Centre of Writing. In 2009 he presented a documentary for BBC Radio 4 about the poet Barry MacSweeney. In 2011 an animated film of his poem ‘The Event’ was broadcast by Channel 4’s Random Acts. He lives in Rotherhithe with his wife and daughters.

Siddhartha Bose is a poet, playwright, academic and theatre-maker based in Hackney, London. He was born in India and spent seven years in the US. Siddhartha is the author of two poetry collections from Penned in the Margins, and has written and performed three works for theatre: Kalagora (2010), London’s Perverted Children (2012) and The Shroud (2014).

The Last London: Iain Sinclair and Brian Catling in conversation

The Last London by Iain Sinclair
The Last London by Iain Sinclair

Select ‘General Admission + Book’ ticket type to include a hardback copy of The Last London (RRP £18.99)

Iain Sinclair has been documenting the peculiar magic of the river-city that absorbs and obsesses him for most of his adult life. In The Last London, he strikes out on a series of solitary walks and collaborative expeditions to make a final reckoning with a capital stretched beyond recognition. Here is a mesmerising record of secret scholars and whispering ghosts. Of disturbing encounters. Night hospitals. Pits that become cameras. Mole Man labyrinths. And privileged swimming pools, up in clouds, patrolled by surveillance helicopters. Where now are the myths, the ultimate fictions of a many times revised city?

Travelling from the pinnacle of the Shard to the outer limits of the London Overground system at Croydon and Barking, from the Thames Estuary to the future ruins of Olympicopolis, Sinclair reflects on where London begins and where it ends. A memoir, a critique, a love letter, The Last London is a delirious conclusion to a truly epic project.

Iain Sinclair is the award-winning writer of numerous critically acclaimed books on London, including Lights Out for the Territory, London Orbital and London Overground. He won the Encore Award and the James Tait Black Memorial Prize for his novel Downriver. He lives in Hackney.

Brian Catling is a sculptor, poet, novelist, film maker and performance artist. His debut novel The Vorrh was praised by Tom Waits (‘I am glad to have the book as a companion on my own dark quest’), Alan Moore (‘The current century’s first landmark work of fantasy and ranking amongst the best pieces ever written in that genre’) and Michael Moorcock (‘It is one of the most original works of visionary fiction since Mervyn Peake’).

Indigo Donut with Patrice Lawrence

We’re excited to welcome 2017 YA Book Award winner and Hackney-resident, Patrice Lawrence to the shop when she’ll be reading from her latest novel, Indigo Donut, before chatting with Fen Coles. 

Seventeen-year-old Indigo has had a tough start in life, having grown up in the care system after her dad killed her mum. Bailey, also seventeen, lives with his parents in Hackney and spends all his time playing guitar or tending to his luscious ginger afro.

When Indigo and Bailey meet at sixth form, serious sparks fly. But when Bailey becomes the target of a homeless man who seems to know more about Indigo than is normal, Bailey is forced to make a choice he should never have to make.
A life-affirming story about falling in love and everyone’s need to belong.

Patrice Lawrence was born in Brighton and brought up in an Italian-Trinidadian household in Mid Sussex. She found her way to east London in the ’90s and lives there with a partner, a teenager and a cat called Stormageddon. She has been writing for as long as she has been reading. She loves crime fiction, sci-fi and trying to grow things. Her ideal mixtape includes drum ‘n’ bass, Bruce Springsteen and Studio Ghibli soundtracks. Music can’t help creeping into her books.

Fen Coles is co-director of Letterbox Library, a 32-year-old children’s booksellers and workers’ cooperative, specialising in inclusive children’s books. Fen has worked at Letterbox Library since 2005. Prior to this she worked in the LGBT and women’s charitable sector, and taught Lesbian Cultural Studies to adult returners (while completing her PhD in lesbian horror films.)

Big Capital: Who is London For? with Anna Minton

Big Capital by Anna Minton
Big Capital by Anna Minton

London is facing the worst housing crisis in modern times, with knock-on effects for the rest of the UK. Despite the desperate shortage of housing, tens, perhaps hundreds of thousands of affordable homes are being pulled down, replaced by luxury apartments aimed at foreign investors. In this ideological war, housing is no longer considered a public good. Instead, only market solutions are considered – and these respond to the needs of global capital, rather than the needs of ordinary people. In politically uncertain times, the housing crisis has become a key driver creating and fuelling the inequalities of a divided nation. Anna Minton cuts through the complexities, jargon and spin to give a clear-sighted account of how we got into this mess and how we can get out of it.

Anna Minton is a writer, journalist and Reader in Architecture at the University of East London. Her first book, Ground Control, was published in 2009 to widespread acclaim. The Royal Commission’s Fellow in the Built Environment between 2011 and 2014, she is a regular contributor to the Guardian and a frequent broadcaster and commentator.

Dr Hannah White is a researcher and writer. In 2015 she examined the importance of council housing with Professor Loretta Lees, University of Leicester and Cambridge House Law Centre based in Southwark and in 2016 organised the conference ‘Can we afford to lose council housing?’ which looked at the likely impact of the Housing and Planning Act 2016. Her other research work includes study of New Labour’s Community Cohesion Framework, institutional racism and prejudice and social inequality.

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Strange Labyrinth by Will Ashon

Strange Labyrinth by Will Ashon
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£14.99 / hardcover

Reserve

A thoughtfully kaleidoscopic and deeply researched exploration of the many radical characters connected with Epping Forest, from poet John Clare to sculptor Jacob Epstein to the punk band Crass. Will Ashon weaves a thread between them that reveals serendipitous similarities, irrelevant of century; they are outlaws, poets, mystics, sometimes undefinable and often misunderstood. Personal, down to earth, fascinating.

Published by Granta on April 6th, 2017

Ben Judah and Rowan Moore

Slow Burn City by Rowan Moore
Slow Burn City by Rowan Moore

This is London by Ben Judah

This is the new London: an immigrant city. Over one-third of Londoners were born abroad, with half arriving since the millennium. This has utterly transformed the capital, for better and for worse.

Ben Judah is an acclaimed foreign correspondent, but here he turns his reporter’s gaze on home, immersing himself in the hidden world of London’s immigrants to reveal the city in the eyes of its beggars, bankers, coppers, gangsters, carers and witch-doctors. From the backrooms of its mosques, Tube tunnels and nightclubs to the frontlines of its streets, Judah has supped with oligarchs and spent nights sleeping rough, worked on building sites and talked business with prostitutes; he’s heard stories of heartbreaking failure, but also witnessed extraordinary acts of compassion.

This is London explodes fossilized myths and offers a fresh, exciting portrait of what it’s like to live, work, fall in love, raise children, grow old and die in London now. Simultaneously intimate and epic, here is a compulsive and deeply sympathetic book on this dizzying world city from one of our brightest new writers.

Ben Judah was born in London. He has travelled widely in Russia, Central Asia and the Levant. His writing has featured widely, including the New York Times, the Evening Standard, the Financial Times and Standpoint. His first book, Fragile Empire, was published by Yale University Press in 2013.

Slow Burn City by Rowan Moore

London has become the global city above all others. Money from all over the world flows through it; its land and homes are tradable commodities; it is a nexus for the world’s migrant populations, rich and poor. Versions of what is happening in London are happening elsewhere, but London has become the best place to understand the way the world’s cities are changing.

Some of the transformations London has undergone were creative, others were destructive; this is not new. London has always been a city of trade, exploitation and opportunity. But London has an equal history of public interventions, including the Clean Air Act, the invention of the green belt and council housing, and the innovation of the sewers and embankments that removed the threat of cholera. In each case the response was creative and unprecedented; they were also huge in scale and often controversial. The city must change, of course, but Moore explains why it should do so with a ‘slow burn’, through the interplay of private investment, public good and legislative action.

Rowan Moore is architecture critic of the Observer and was named Critic of the Year at the UK press awards 2014. He is the author of Slow Burn City and Why We Build.

Ben and Rowan will be in conversation with Guardian writer and Hackney resident Dave Hill.

David Rosenberg and Matthew Beaumont in conversation with Will Self

Night Walking by Matthew Beaumont
Night Walking by Matthew Beaumont

Rebel Footprints by David Rosenberg

The radical response to conservative heritage tours and banal day-tripper guides, Rebel Footprints brings to life the history of social movements in the capital. Transporting readers from well-known landmarks to history-making hidden corners, David Rosenberg tells the story of protest and struggle in London from the early nineteenth to the mid-twentieth century.

From the suffragettes to the socialists, from the Chartists to the trade unionists, the book invites us to step into the footprints of a diverse cast of dedicated fighters for social justice. Individual chapters highlight particular struggles and their participants, from famous faces to lesser-known luminaries.

Rosenberg sets London’s radical campaigners against the backdrop of the city’s multi-faceted development. Self-directed walks pair with narratives that seamlessly blend history, politics and geography. Specially commissioned maps and illustrations immerse the reader in the story of the city.

Whether visiting it for the first time, or born and raised in it, Rosenberg invites you to see London as you never have before: the nation’s capital as its radical centre.

Night Walking with Matthew Beaumont

“Cities, like cats, will reveal themselves at night,” wrote the poet Rupert Brooke. Before the age of electricity, the nighttime city was a very different place to the one we know today – home to the lost, the vagrant and the noctambulant. Matthew Beaumont recounts an alternative history of London by focusing on those of its denizens who surface on the streets when the sun’s down. If nightwalking is a matter of “going astray” in the streets of the metropolis after dark, then nightwalkers represent some of the most suggestive and revealing guides to the neglected and forgotten aspects of the city.

In this brilliant work of literary investigation, Beaumont shines a light on the shadowy perambulations of poets, novelists and thinkers: Chaucer and Shakespeare; William Blake and his ecstatic peregrinations and the feverish ramblings of opium addict Thomas De Quincey; and, among the lamp-lit literary throng, the supreme nightwalker Charles Dickens. We discover how the nocturnal city has inspired some and served as a balm or narcotic to others. In each case, the city is revealed as a place divided between work and pleasure, the affluent and the indigent, where the entitled and the desperate jostle in the streets.

Remaking London: Ben Campkin in Conversation

Remaking London by Ben Campkin
Remaking London by Ben Campkin
Between the slum clearances of the early twentieth century and debates about the post-Olympic city, the drive to ‘regenerate’ London has intensified. Yet today, with a focus on increasing land values, regeneration schemes purporting to foster diverse and creative new neighbourhoods typically displace precisely the qualities, activities and communities they claim to support. In Remaking London Ben Campkin provides a lucid and stimulating historical account of urban regeneration, exploring how decline and renewal have been imagined and realised at different scales. Focussing on present-day regeneration areas that have been key to the capital’s modern identity, Campkin explores how these places have been stigmatised through identification with material degradation, and spatial and social disorder. Drawing on diverse sources – including journalism, photography, cinema, theatre, architectural design, advertising and television – he illuminates how ideas of decline drive urban change.